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Different Species of Lions

 
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abby9ak
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2006 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Ok heres a new question. What type of lion is this? http://www.meandmephoto.com/NewZoo/NuZuJpeg/Lion.jpg
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tigerfreak99
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2006 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Right from that site. Wink

http://www.meandmephoto.com/NewZoo/Lion.html#MENU

Our male is a very beautiful specimen. The mane points to a close relationship to the now very rare Ethiopian Lions, known for their black manes. The mane is there to protect his neck from harm during those constant territorial fights with his competitors. It gets pretty bloody in the wild.
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Last edited by tigerfreak99 on Mon Jan 16, 2006 8:49 pm; edited 1 time in total
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abby9ak
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2006 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Tigerfreak got it!good guess Ace
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ace1fan
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2006 8:52 pm    Post subject: Ethiopian Vs. Barbary Lion Reply with quote
I was editing that post & you are MIGHTY QUICK Abby.....

Whoa - Ethiopian Lion - sure looks like a Barbary Lion Exclamation

http://www.tigerhomes.org/animal/barbary-lion.cfm

Wonder if you guys can find out the differences between the two Question They sure look a lot alike Exclamation


Ace
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tigerfreak99
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2006 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Looks like a barbary lion because of the mane length so I'm just gonna call it a Barbiopian! Razz My guess is the Ethiopian is just a color mutation.

Ok, I'm out! Going to watch the Bachelor and then going to bed! So a good night to you all!

P.S. Val, you know I would never send you a cyberslap... only Hazel and TA. Twisted Evil
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vlad
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2006 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
I'm following up on Ace's suggesion about nerding on the characteristics of these two lion species. Besides - "Inquiring Minds would like to know" Wink Mr. Green Exclamation

Below is a link to a great site detailing the distinguishing characteristics of the Barbary Lion. The lion pictured is gorgeous with a lush, full, dark-haired mane.

"The Barbary (Atlas, Nubian) lion (Panthera leo leo) was the largest and was found throughout Northern Africa from Morocco to Egypt. The Barbary Lion had a more compact, heavier build than its cousins. An adult male could weigh about 220-270 kg, and it's overall length was about 2.72-3.33 m. It's face had a short broad muzzle with a wide face and large round amber eyes. The eyes had a very clear light iris, rather than brown like the African or Asian. The fur in the inside foreleg of the female was white. The mane that surrounded the face was blonde, while the rest of the mane gave the appearance of being black. The mane was actually a combination of tawny gray mixed with bright brown and blackish brown hairs. All Barbary Lions have this color mane, there are no variations. The only time a Barbary has blonde in its mane is when the animal is immature, or has lost some of its mane and is experiencing re-growth. African and Asian Lions can have many varieties of mane colors, ranging from blonde to red to brown to black. The mane of the Barbary is thick and lush, and extends down the chest through the front legs, down the back below the shoulder, and the length of the belly through to the groin. It gives the appearance of being 50% mane. The ground color of the coat is darker and more grayish than that of the more southern lion populations, and the hair in both sexes is longer."

The above excerpt is from an article by Armando G. Amador, entitled "Barbary Lion", Last updated on April 22, 2001

http://www.il-st-acad-sci.org/mammals/cat1002a.html

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abby9ak
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 3:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
I found some more lion pictures.hehe there Lions but witch Lion dose not belong???this is all to easy.If you get it wrong you have a LOT of nerding to do Very Happy

#1.
http://scd.mm-b1.yimg.com/image/684231510

#3.
http://scd.mm-b1.yimg.com/image/957209132


Last edited by abby9ak on Sat Sep 02, 2006 9:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
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kellieg1979
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Number two don't belong only because its a seal, not a lion. Like the pics though!!
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abby9ak
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2006 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
hehe very good Very Happy I was going to but what they were above the picture....but I desided that It would be fun to see how knew there lion pictures Very Happy
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mali
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote
Was there a Lion species smaller than the Asiatic?
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vlad
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2006 2:06 am    Post subject: Asiatic Lion Question Reply with quote
Mali,

Can't believe I missed this question -- and it is a very good one. Don't know the answer to that one off the top of my head. Did I mention that Ace is also memorizing the internet...

BTW -- There is an entire website dedicated to Asiatic lions. That website includes an Asiatic Lion News section!

The Asiatic lion news page
http://www.asiatic-lion.org/news.html
(Asiatic Lion Information Centre website)

I'm going to look for the answer to that question. Maybe someone will find it first! All nerdalator input is WELCOME!

EDIT:

The history of the Asiatic lion is a very sad thing. Back in 1910 they were nearly wiped out and presently only exist in the Gir Forest. They are also known as the Indian lion. Asiatic lions are currently considered to be critically endangered.

The Lion of India
http://www.asiatic-lion.org/intro.html
(Asiatic Lion Information Centre website)

Here is what happened to them:


Quote:
As India’s population grew and began cultivating or settling more and more of its forest and scrublands, the Asiatic lion was squeezed nearly out of existence. Early this century the Gir Forest area in the state of Gujarat on the west coast was afflicted with a terrible famine brought on by a severe drought: one so devastating that it is still mentioned in the folklore of the region. Because of the strained circumstances, the lion population began preying on the human population in the area. This prompted a massive backlash against the lions, resulting in a catastrophic decline in their population. In 1910 there were reported to be fewer than two dozen lions left in the wild although this low figure may have been publicised to discourage lion hunting - census data from the time indicates the population was probably closer to 100.

Before they were completely wiped out, the lions came under the protection of the Nawab of Junagadh, a local monarch, who banned all lion hunting in the area. Soon, the lion population began to rise in number. By the declaration of Indian independence in 1947, the government had come to realise the importance and fragile nature of this last bastion of the Asiatic lion, and the Nawab’s conservation policy was upheld. Naturalists were assigned to study and take a census of the Gir’s lion population. At that time there were around 200 lions.

The Indian government then created the Gir National Park and Lion Sanctuary - collectively known as the Gir Protected Area (PA), covering over 1000 km². The area is made up of dry scrubland with hills, rivers, and teak forest. In addition to the lion population, the Gir PA contains leopards, antelope, deer, jackals, hyenas, and marsh crocodiles.


In partial answer to your question -- the Asiatic lion is considered to be slightly smaller than the African lion. I got that much from the Asiatic Lion Information Centre website. More nerding to do...

V

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ace1fan
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2006 10:04 am    Post subject: Asiatic Lion Preservation Reply with quote
Our Moderator is a MAJOR Nerdalator Very Happy Great question Mali ~ and since Val already answered although she reservers the right to continue to "NERD", this is just for ad lib Wink I first learned of the Lion and their subspecies in the Power Cats DVD from Dave and Jason. Jason told us specifically about Ranthamhore and Gir parks and the conservation work being done in India.

In the THO Educational Center you will find the Power Cat Curriculum : http://www.tigerhomes.org/animal/curriculums/power-cats-pc.cfm

Here is that reference to the Asiatic Lion:
http://www.tigerhomes.org/animal/curriculums/asiatic-lions-pc.cfm

The critically endangered Asiatic Lion, was brought back from the brink of near extinction and is fully protected at GPA (Gir Protected Area), formerly the Sultan's private game reserve, during the last 100 years. Most statistics show recent population count is up from 327 in the year 2,000 to the last published population statistic showing there are 359 Asiatic Lions.

Here are some of the Lion subspecies recognized Panthera Leo subspecies & their territories:


Panthera leo azandica - North East Congo Lion
Panthera leo bleyenberghi - Katanga Lion
Panthera leo hollisteri - Congo Lion
Panthera leo krugeri -South African Lion
Panthera leo leo (P.l.berberisca) - Barbary Lion (Atlas Mountains in Northern Africa)
...(Extinct in the Wild since 1922)
Panthera leo massaicus - Massai Lion
Panthera leo melanochaita - Cape Lion (Extinct since 1860)
Panthera leo nubica - East African Lion
Panthera leo persica - Asiatic Lion (India)
Panthera leo roosevelti- Abyssinian Lion
Panthera leo senegalensis - West African Lion (Senegal Lion)
Panthera leo somaliensis - Somali Lion
Panthera leo verneyi - Kalahari Lion


It should be noted that Panthera leo maculatus - Marozi (Spotted Lion) is not formally confirmed as a separate subspecies and is thought to be a naturally occuring Lion/Leopard hybrid.

Here is an important point also made by Jason in the Power Cats DVD about the threat of disease, i.e. the outbreak of canine distemper in the African Lion population that destroyed significant numbers of animals:

See an excerpt from an article written Chad Boutin discussing the work of environmentalist Andy Dobson just published the Princeton Weekly Bulletin on the threat of diseases in the ecosystems:


Quote:
Modeling Diseases and Ecosystems
A look at the gastrointestinal tract of a lion — itself a diverse ecosystem teeming with viruses, protozoa, bacteria and worms — provides an example. Many of these have struck a bargain with the animal’s digestive system and coexist peacefully with its army of cellular defenses, while others are aggressively using the host as a food source to fuel their own reproductive efforts.

“When a lion attacks a wildebeest, it’s almost instantaneous,” Dobson said. “While infection with a pathogen is also instantaneous, the impact on the lion can take a number of different directions that affect both the welfare of the lion and the virus. A virus can mutate in a matter of hours, and undergo major genetic shifts in a couple of years! But its heavy dependence on its host for survival means that the presence of a single infected lion can also have a major effect on an entire population. A single disease outbreak in the Serenegti can reduce the lion population by up to a third.”

As a result of infection, the lion could simply die, which would remove it from the ecosystem, or it could spread the disease to other lions, or even other species, leading to cascading effects throughout the food web.


http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S16/34/34C48/index.xml?section=featured

It appears the small Asiatic population in this area is stable at this point but efforts are underway to establish a second population at Palpur-Kuno Wildlife Sanctuary to ensure genetic survival and genetic diversity:

Source: IUCN Database (2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species)
Quote:
The Asiatic lion currently exists as a single population, and is thus vulnerable to extinction from unpredictable events, such as an epidemic or large forest fire. Establishment of at least one other wild population is advisable for population safety, for maximizing genetic diversity, and in terms of ecology (re-establishing the lion as a component of the fauna in its former range). However, there are problems in attempting this: a previous attempt to establish a second population in the Chandraprabha Wildlife Sanctuary in eastern Uttar Pradesh appeared to be succeeding, as the population grew from three to 11 animals, but then the lions disappeared, presumably shot or poisoned (Nowell and Jackson 1996). Palpur-Kuno Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Madhya Pradesh has now been selected as the best candidate area. Communities will require resettlement to make room for the Lions, but this time great care is being taken to make the process participatory and to attempt to satisfy local needs, and not engender hostility toward Lion conservation.


http://www.iucnredlist.org/search/details.php/15952/all

Ace
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